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Using a water that has sodium, like from bottled water, tap water, or from a water softener, is exactly what you want to stay away from.

Plants suffering from sodium toxicity show a vast amount of problems, dependent upon how resilient your strains are, and how healthy your plants are overall.

These factors play a great deal in the final outcome. Marijuana plants are most susceptible to this under 3 weeks of age. Sodium causes stunting droopiness and most of the time, nitrogen, magnesium and calcium are the nutrients to be locked out first; twisting and discoloration on the leaves, mostly lower to middle is where it starts.

They will always have a droopy look to them even when your soil is kind of dry; the leaves never stay perky when there is too much sodium in the system soil ad hydroponics alike.

In order to fix this problem you need to flush your soil out with a lot of clean sodium free water. Flush with as much clean water as you can with a volume of 2x the amount of the size of your container.

So if you have a 2 gallon size pot; use 4 gallons of water to flush it out. Shortly after, flush it out and put more clean water in, then you can apply your nutrients.

Strips will tell you pH levels, mineral content and any other things that may be lurking in your water. If you do have hard water, you may want to consider installing a reverse osmosis system.

Reverses osmosis systems not only clean the water, but also removes the calcium and magnesium and other mineral deposits from pipes and other questionable sources.

High levels of calcium and magnesium are what primarily contribute to hard water. If you choose to use a reverse osmosis, you will need to supplement your plants with a little more calcium and magnesium to make up for the slight loss.

PH Problems: Too high or too low a PH can lock up nutrients in the form of indissoluble salts and compounds, some of which are actually toxic to the plants.

What then happens is the grower then tries to supplement the plants diet by adding more fertilizers, throwing off the pH even more and locking up even more critical nutrients.

This type of problem is seen more often in soil mixes, where inconsistent mixing of the medium's components leads to "hot" spots.

One of the first signs of having a slight PH problem is your plant having part of its leaves twisty and spotty with brown, yellowish, red spots within each other.

These discolorations mainly start on big fan leaves then move on to little leaves. For the vegetative period try a N:P:K ratio of about which of course is the same ratio as , and for flowering plants, Check the pH after adding nutrients.

If you use a reservoir, keep it circulating and change it every 2 weeks. These numbers are just a guideline, and many factors can change the actual level the plants will need.

Certain nutrients are "invisible" to TDS meters, especially organics, so use TDS level only as an estimate of actual nutrient levels.

When in doubt about a new fertilizer, follow the fertilizer's directions. Incorrect feeding of your plants can cause nutrient toxicity or nutrient deficiencies.

Calcium Ca : Raises soil pH; promotes root hair formation and early growth. Chlorine Cl : Needed for photosynthesis; stimulates root growth and aids water circulation in plants.

Cobalt Co : Improves growth, water circulation, and photosynthesis. Copper Cu : Stimulates stem development and pigment formation.

It regulates the respiration of the plant's cells. Magnesium Mg : Aids in chlorophyll formation and energy metabolism; it increases oil production in flax and soy beans; helps regulate uptake of other elements.

It also promotes healthy, disease-resistant plants. It is generally available in acidic soils. Manganese Mn : Necessary for the formation of chlorophyll.

Molybdenum Mo : Needed for nitrogen fixation and nitrogen use in the plant; stimulates plant growth and vigor much like nitrogen.

Silicon Si : Increases number of seeds; strengthens cell walls of plants. Sodium Na : Increases resistance to drought; increases sugar content in some crops.

Sulfur S : Aids in formation of certain oil compounds that give specific odors to some plants such as onions, garlic, mustard, etc; increases oil production in flax and soy beans.

Zinc Z : Stimulates stem growth and flower bud formation. Following this, the nutrients will be taken from old leaves to assist in newer growths.

Mobile elements are more likely to exhibit visual deficiencies in the older leaves, primarily due to the heavy resource demand on newer foliage development.

Nitrate - Ammonium is found in both inorganic and organic forms in the plant, and combines with carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and sometimes sulfur to form amino acids, amino enzymes, nucleic acids, chlorophyll, alkaloids, and purine bases.

Nitrogen rates high as molecular weight proteins in plant tissue. Plants need lots of N during vegging, but it's easy to overdo it. Nitrogen plays a key role for your plants; it is directly responsible for production of chlorophyll, photosynthesis, and amino acids which are the building block of Proteins.

These myriad of enzymes help the plants growth in terms of leaf and stem development and the how well the vigor of your plants is.

Symptoms of a Nitrogen Deficiency: Plants will exhibit lack of vigor, slow growth and will be weak and stunted. Quality and yield will be significantly reduced.

Older leaves become yellow chlorotic from lack of chlorophyll. Deficient plants will exhibit uniform light green to yellow on older leaves, and these leaves may die and drop.

Leaf margins will not curl up noticeably. Chlorosis will eventually spread throughout the plant. Stems, petioles and lower leaf surfaces may turn purple.

Little new growth, yellow leaves: this being more pronounced in older leaves. Earlier fall leaf drop.

New shoots may be red to redbrown. If excess is severe, leaves will dry and begin to fall off.

Root system will remain under developed or deteriorate after time. Fruit and flower set will be inhibited or deformed.

Breakdown of vascular tissue restricting water uptake. Stress resistance is drastically diminished. Nitrogen Deficiency Solution: For a quick fix you can make weekly foliar applications of fish emulsion or manure tea.

Over the long-term apply aged compost, manure, soybean meal or cottonseed meal to the soil once in Spring. Seaweed extract will improve the soil environment thus giving nitrogen fixing bacteria a boost.

Any chemical or organic fertilizers that have Nitrogen in them will fix a nitrogen deficiency. If you need to give your plants a quick solution to nitrogen and you want to use blood meal, I suggest making it into a tea for faster use, where blood meal is slow acting, but when made into a tea it works quicker!

Other sources of nitrogen are dried blood, cotton seed meal which is slow acting, insect eating bat guano which is fast acting.

Bone meal is a gradual absorption when not made into a tea also an excellent source of phosphorus. Fish Meal Or Fish Emulsion is a good source of nitrogen and is medium acting.

Worm castings are good; gradual absorption. Nitrogen deficient plants usually recover in about a week, affected leaves will not recover.

Bone Meal, Rock Phosphate, Wood Ashes pretty much all ashes, Shellfish Compost and Crab Meal are all alkaline and can make your ph go up, so if you add any of these please monitor your ph.

Flush the soil with plain water. Soluble nitrogen especially nitrate is the form that's the most quickly available to the roots, while insoluble N like urea first needs to be broken down by microbes in the soil before the roots can absorb it.

Avoid excessive ammonium nitrogen, which can interfere with other nutrients. Too much N delays flowering.

Plants should be allowed to become Nitrogen-deficient late in flowering for best flavor. Leaves may curl under, go brown and die. Small-formed buds are another main symptom.

Phosphorus deficient plants exhibit slow growth with dark green or purple pigmentation in older leaves and stems. Some deficiency during flowering is normal, but too much shouldn't be tolerated.

Red petioles and stems are a normal, genetic characteristic for many varieties, plus it can also be a co-symptom of N, K, and Mg-deficiencies, so red stems are not a foolproof sign of P-deficiency.

Too much P can lead to iron deficiency. Plants deficient in Phosphorus will exhibit an overall dark green with purple, blue or reddish cast to leaves particularly on underside, veins and stems and some plants respond to lack of P with yellowing.

Foliage may be sparse, small and distorted becoming mottled and bronzy with maturity. Very distinctive symptoms. Excess foliage with no flowers can also indicate lack of P.

Purpling; accumulation of anthocyanin pigments; causes an overall dark green color with a purple, red, or blue tint, and is the common sign of phosphate deficiency.

Some plant species and varieties respond to phosphate deficiency by yellowing instead of purpling.

Purpling is natural to some healthy ornamentals. Excess phosphorus can interfere with the availability and stability of copper and zinc.

Phosphorus Deficiency Solution: Lower pH to 5. Any chemical or organic fertilizers that have Phosphorus in them will fix a Phosphorus deficiency.

A quick fix is to spray plant weekly with fish emulsion until symptoms quit. Apply a light soil dressing of wood ashes. Incorporate aged compost into the soil to boost microorganisms.

Your long term strategy is to mix rock phosphate or aged manure into the soil in Fall. If you have a phosphorus deficiency you should use any N-P-K ratio that is over 5.

Again, Peters all purpose is a good mix. Fruit eating bat guano, which is fast absorption, worm castings, which is gradual absorption, fish meal, which is medium absorption; soft rock phosphate, which is medium absorption, Jamaican or Indonesian guano, which is fast absorption.

Crabshell, which is slow absorption. Tiger Bloom also works, which is fast absorption. Affected leaves will not show recovery but new growth will appear normal.

Phosphorus Toxicity Solution: If you added to much chemical fertilizers and or organics, which is hard to burn your plants when using organics You need to Flush the soil with plain water.

You need to use 2 times as much water as the size of the pot, for example: If you have a 5 gallon pot and need to flush it, you need to use 10 gallons of water to rinse out the soil good enough to get rid of excessive nutrients.

Potassium is involved in maintaining the water status of the plant as well as regulating the pressure of it's cells and the opening and closing of the stomata.

Potassium is required in the accumulation and translocation of carbohydrates. Lack of potassium will severely reduce yield and quality.

Symptoms of a Potassium Deficiency: Sickly looking plants, undersized fruits, leaves showing marginal and interveinal yellowing.

Yellowing starts on older leaves and progresses upwards. Leaves may crinkle, turn brown and roll upwards.

Blossoms may be distorted and small. Plant has little resistance to 31 heat, cold and disease problems. Potash deficiency is mostly in the upper levels of soil.

Older leaves are initially chlorotic but soon develop dark necrotic lesions dead tissue. First apparent on the tips and margins of the leaves.

Stem and branches may become weak and easily broken, the plant may also stretch. The plant will become susceptible to disease and toxicity.

In addition to appearing to look like iron deficiency, the tips of the leaves curl and the edges burn and die.

Too much sodium Na displaces K, causing a K deficiency. Sources of high salinity are: baking soda sodium bicarbonate "pH-up" , too much manure, and the use of water-softening filters which should not be used.

If the problem is Na, flush the soil. K can get locked up from too much Ca or ammonium 32 nitrogen, and cold environmental conditions.

Potassium Toxicity: Usually not absorbed excessively by plants. Excess potassium can aggravate the uptake of magnesium, manganese, zinc and iron and effect the availability of calcium.

Potassium Deficiency Solution: For a quick fix you can spray plant weekly with fish emulsion until symptoms quit. Over the long term apply seaweed, manure, granite dust or greensand to the soil in fall.

Hardwood ashes may be applied to soil anytime. Some other supplements of potassium are: Wood ashes, which are fast absorption, Kelp Meal, which is medium absorption, Greensand, which is slow absorption, granite dust, which is slow absorption.

Earth Juice Meta-K, which is fast acting can also serve tobring down your ph level as well. Leaves will never recover, but the plant will show recovery after about 4 to 5 days when using a fast acting nutrient.

Note: Wood Ashes can make your ph go up, so please monitor your ph whenever utilizing it. Symptoms of a Magnesium Deficiency: A lack of magnesium is characterized almost identically with iron deficiency but the older leaves, generally at the bottom of the plant, show marginal and interveinal reddening or yellowing with leaf base and midrib staying green.

Later in the season interveinal necrosis may occur. Leaves may be brittle and thin with leaf curling and stunted growth.

In the Fall as temperatures cool plants are unable to take up Mg and leaves will turn a purple color. The older leaves will be the first to develop interveinal chlorosis.

Starting at leaf margin or tip and progressing inward between the veins. The tips may also twist. Magnesium Toxicity: Magnesium toxicity is rare and not generally exhibited visibly.

Extreme high levels will antagonize other ions in the nutrient solution. Magnesium Deficiency Solution: Epsom salts magnesium sulfate can be used for magnesium deficiency.

You can use it watering with a mix of teaspoons or Epsom salts dissolved in 1 gallon of water or using the mix as foliar spray.

Make 3 applications 6 weeks apart. Other treatments include adding fish meal, basic slag, greensand or dolomitic limestone.

When mixing up soil, use 2 teaspoon dolomite lime per gallon of soil. Keep soil pH above 6. If the starting water is above ppm this hard water will lock out mg due to the excess calcium.

Mg can get locked-up by too much Ca, Cl or ammonium nitrogen. Don't overdo Mg or you'll inevitably lock up other nutrients.

Other nutrients that have magnesium in them are: Epsom salts fast absorption. Dolomite lime and or garden lime, which is slow absorption.

Sulfate of Potash, Magnesia which is medium absorption. Worm Castings, which is slow absorption.

Crabshell which is also slow absorption. Earth Juice Mircoblast, which is fast acting. Zinc Zn - Micro Nutrient and Immobile Element Zinc plays a roll in the same enzyme functions as manganese and magnesium.

More than eighty enzymes contain tightly bound zinc essential for their function. Zinc participates in chlorophyll formation and helps prevent chlorophyll destruction.

Carbonic anhydrate has been found to be specifically activated by zinc. Symptoms of a Zinc Deficiencies: Zinc deficiencies are mainly found on sandy soils low in organic matter and on organic soils.

Zinc deficiencies occur more often during cold, wet Spring weather. New and intermediate leaves are small, yellow, sometimes with a grayish cast.

Narrow and older leaves may drop. Small shoots may show rosetting followed by dieback. Test the soil for a pH Imbalance, making sure that the pH is between 5.

A pH imbalance can inhibit the absorption of zinc and other nutrients. Deficiencies appear as chlorosis in the inter-veinal areas of new leaves producing a banding appearance.

This may be accompany reduction of leaf size and a shortening between internodes. Leaf margins are often distorted or wrinkled.

Branch terminals will die back in severe cases. Zn, Fe, and Mn deficiencies often occur together, and are usually from a high pH.

Don't overdo the micro-nutrients, lower the pH if that's the problem so the nutrients become available. Foliar feed if the plant looks real bad.

Use chelated zinc. Zinc deficiency produces "little leaf" in many species, especially woody ones; the younger leaves are distinctly smaller than normal.

A Zinc deficiency may also produce "rosetting"; the stem fails to elongate behind the growing tip, so that the terminal leaves become tightly bunched.

Organic compounds such as zinc chelates zinc EDTA and zinc NTA are about five times more effective than inorganic salts with equivalent amounts of zinc.

Apply aged organic manure. Zinc Toxicity: Excess Zinc is extremely toxic and will cause rapid death.

Excess zinc interferes with iron causing chlorosis from iron deficiency. Excess will cause sensitive plants to become chlorotic. And any of the following nutrients will fix a zinc deficiency: Zinc sulfate, zinc chelated, or zinc oxides are adequate fertilizer sources for zinc.

Or you can bury galvanized nails in the soil. Make sure you take off the sharp point at the end to prevent roots from being damaged Garden Manure, which is slow acting.

Sulfur S - Micro Nutrient and Immobile Element Sulfate is involved in protein synthesis and is part of the amino acids, cystine and thiamine, which are the building blocks of proteins.

It is active in the structure and metabolism in the plant. It is essential for respiration and the synthesis and breakdown of fatty acids.

Symptoms of a Sulfur Deficiency: Leaves are pale yellow-green at any stage of development. Shoots are stunted.

Similar to chlorosis. Perform a soil test; correct as necessary. The initial symptoms are the yellowing of the entire leaf including veins , usually starting with the younger leaves.

Leaf tips may yellow and curl downward. Sulfur deficiencies are light green fruit or younger leaves with a lack of succulence.

Elongated roots and woody stem. Upper stems of plant may appear purple. Although many varieties of cannabis do get purplish stems, the trait generally extends the entire length of the plant's stem, and not just near the top.

Leaves yellowing or scorched at edges. Excess may cause early senescence. Sulfur Deficiency Solution: Lower pH to 5.

Add sulfur or potassium sulfate as necessary. Use caution when applying sulfur compounds, however. Too much sulfur "sulfur toxicity" appears as veinal chlorosis followed by rapid defoliation of the lower leaves.

Mix teaspoons of Epsom salts per gallon of water until condition improves. Other sulfur nutrient supplements are: Rain water, Ammonium Thiosulfate all are fast absorption.

Garden Sulfur, Sulfate of Potash, and Gypsum work wonders as well. Calcium plays an important role in maintaining cell integrity and membrane permeability.

Symptoms of a Calcium Deficiency: Young leaves are small and distorted with curled back leaf tips.

Shoots may be stunted and show some dieback, roots will be stunted. These young leaves are affected first and become small and distorted or chlorotic with irregular margins, spotting or necrotic areas.

Bud development is severely inhibited, blossom end rot and internal decay may also occur and root may be under developed or die back.

Deficiency will cause leaf tip die-back, leaf tip curl and marginal necrosis and chlorosis primarily in younger leaves.

May precipitate with sulfur in solution and cause clouding or residue in tank. Excess calcium may produce deficiencies in magnesium and potassium.

Calcium Deficiency Solution: To fix a calcium deficiency you can treat by foliar feeding with one teaspoon of dolomite lime or garden lime per quart of water.

You can also take crushed up dolomite lime or garden lime in a gallon of water and water it in the soil.

Garden Gypsum, which is medium absorption. Note: Caution when using gypsum to an already acid soil pH that is less than 5.

Iron Fe - Micro Nutrient and Immobile Element Iron is an important component of plant enzyme systems for electron transport to carry electrons during photosynthesis and terminal respiration.

It is a catalyst for chlorophyll production and is required for nitrate and sulfate reduction and assimilation. Symptoms of an Iron Deficiency: New leaves are the most symptomatic and when condition is most severe they can be all yellow or white but still have green veins.

Overall you see yellow leaves with green veins leading to marginal scorching or browning of leaf tips. Tip leaves, especially basal areas of leaflets, intense chlorotic mottling; stem near tip also yellow.

Fruits have poor color. Shoot diameter is small. Iron deficit often occurs when the soil pH is higher than 7. Lack of Fe is common in plants living next to concrete walls, foundations etc.

Perform a soil test; correct soil pH to 7. Pronounced interveinal chlorosis similar to that caused by magnesium 42 deficiency but on the younger leaves as well as leaves exhibit chlorosis yellowing of the leaves mainly between the veins, starting with the lower and middle leaves.

Iron Toxicity: Excess accumulation is rare but could cause bronzing or tiny brown spots on leaf surface. Iron Deficiency Solution: Lower soil pH to 6.

Avoid fertilizers that contain excessive manganese and Zn. In iron-deficient soils, add bone meal or blood meal organic amendments, or add iron sulfate or chelated iron liquid or granular inorganic amendments.

For a quick fix you can apply chelated iron directly to soil or as a foliar spray. Over the long-term improve the soil by adding inches of compost in the spring every year.

Foliar feed with chemical fertilizer containing Fe or rusty water can work well. Other supplements that have Iron in them are; Iron chelates, Ferric oxide, Ferrous oxide, Ferrous sulfate, all of these are fast absorption.

Greensand, Cottonseed Meal is slow absorption, Garden Manure, which is medium absorption. Manure is most common organic iron source to use.

An Iron Deficiency is also caused by factors that interfere with iron absorption of roots: over irrigation, excessive soluble salts, inadequate drainage, pests, high substrate pH, or nematodes.

This is easily corrected by adding an iron supplement with the next watering. Fe is unavailable to plants when the pH of the water or soil is too high.

If deficient, lower the pH to about 6. Use iron that's chelated for maximum availability. Read your fertilizer's ingredients - chelated iron might read something like "iron EDTA".

To much Fe without adding enough P can cause a P-deficiency. Note: When adding iron to the solution, it is often necessary to not use fertilizer for that watering.

Iron has a tendency of reacting with many of the components of fertilizer solutions, and will cause nutrient lockup to occur.

Read the labels of both the iron supplement and the fertilizer you are using before you attempt to combine the two.

Biochemical research shows that this element plays a structural role in the chloroplast membrane system, and also activates numerous enzymes.

Symptoms of a Manganese Deficiency: Similar to a Nitrogen deficiency, leaves display marginal scorching, rolling and reduced width.

Yellowing may also occur between leaf veins or total yellowing on youngest leaves. Interveinal chlorosis of younger leaves, necrotic lesions and leaf shredding are typical symptom of this deficiency.

High levels can cause uneven distribution of chlorophyll resulting in blotchy appearance. Restricted growth and failure to mature normally can also result.

Mn gets locked out when the pH is too high, and when there's too much iron. Use chelated Mn. Growth rate will slow and vigor will decline.

Manganese Deficiency Solution: Perform a soil pH test; correct to 6. In deficient soils, add millorganite or houorganite treated sludge organic amendments, or add manganese sulfate inorganic amendments.

Foliar feed with any chemical fertilizer containing Mn, or mix with water and water your plants with it.

Other nutrients that have Manganese in them are; Manganese chelate, Manganese carbonate, Manganese chloride, Manganese dioxide, Manganese oxide, Manganese sulfate, which are all fast absorption.

Chloride Cl Chlorine is involved in the evolution of oxygen in the photosynthesis process and is essential for cell division in roots and leaves.

Chloride raises the cell osmotic pressure and affects stomata regulation and increases the hydration of plant tissue.

Symptoms of a Chloride Deficiency: Wilted chlorotic leaves become bronze in color. Roots become stunted and thickened near tips.

Plants with chlorine deficiencies will be pale and suffer wilting. Chloride Toxicity: Burning of leaf tip or margins.

Bronzing, yellowing and leaf splitting. Reduced leaf size and lower growth rate. Chlorine sensitive plants may experience tip or marginal leaf burn at concentrations above 20 ppm.

Boron B - Micronutrient and Immobile Element Boron amounts in the soil is directly proportional to the amount of organic matter. Boron biochemical functions are yet uncertain, but evidence suggests it is involved in the synthesis of one of the bases for nucleic acid RNA uracil formation.

It may also be involved in some cellular activities such as division, differentiation, maturation and respiration.

It is associated with pollen germination. Symptom of a Boron Deficiency: Youngest leaves may be red, bronze or scorched also small, thick or brittle.

New shoot tips may form what is called a witches broom. Stems stiff; terminal buds die and growths die back; lateral shoots developed, giving plant flat top; leaves highly tinted purple, brown and yellow.

Fruit and vegetables may have heart rot. Fruits pitted and corky areas in skin; ripening is uneven. Boron deficiencies are found mainly in acid, sandy soils in regions of high rainfall, and those with low soil organic matter.

Borate ions are 47 mobile in soil and can be leached from the root zone. Boron deficiencies are more pronounced during drought periods when root activity is restricted.

Plants deficient in boron exhibit brittle abnormal growth at shoot tips and one of the earliest symptoms is failure of root tips to elongate normally.

Stem and root apical meristems often die. Root tips often become swollen and discolored. Internal tissues may rot and become host to fungal disease.

Leaves show various symptoms which include drying, thickening, distorting, wilting, and chlorotic or necrotic spotting. Boron Toxicity: Yellowing of leaf tip followed by necrosis of the leaves beginning at tips or margins and progressing inward before leaves die and prematurely fall off.

Some plants are especially sensitive to boron accumulation. Boron Deficiency Solution: Apply household borax at a rate 1 tablespoon borax to 12 quarts of water.

This amount will treat a foot row of vegetables or 10 square feet of soil. Apply two times weeks apart. One of the ways you can fix a boron deficiency is to either foliar spray or water accordingly.

Assists in carbohydrate metabolism, nitrogen fixation and in the process of oxygen reduction. Symptoms of a Copper Deficiency: Copper deficiencies are mainly seen on sandy soils which are low in organic matter.

Copper uptake decreases as soil pH increases. Increased phosphorus and iron availability in soils decreases copper uptake by plants.

Small leaves with necrotic dead spots and brown areas near the leaf tips. Rosetting of the leaves and dieback of terminal shoots.

Reduced or stunted growth with a distortion of the younger leaves and growth tip die-back. Young leaves often become dark green and twisted.

They may die back or just exhibit necrotic spots. Growth and yield will be deficient as well. Copper Toxicity: Copper is required in very small amounts and readily becomes toxic in solution culture if not carefully controlled.

Excess values will induce iron deficiency. Root growth will be suppressed followed by symptoms of iron chlorosis, stunting, reduced branching, abnormal darkening and thickening of roots.

Other nutrients that have copper in them are: Granular, Garden Manure, Greensand. Note: Damaged leaves will NOT recover. Molybdenum Mo Molybdenum is a component of two major enzyme systems involved in the nitrate reeducates, this is the process of conversion of nitrate to ammonium.

Symptom of a Molybdenum Deficiency: Often interveinal chlorosis which occurs first on older leaves, then progressing to the entire plant.

Developing severely twisted younger leaves which eventually die. Molybdenum deficiencies frequently resemble nitrogen, with older leaves chlorotic with rolled margins and stunted growth.

Molybdenum Toxicity: Excess may cause discoloration of leaves depending on plant species. This condition is rare but could occur from accumulation by continuous application.

Used by the plant in very small quantities. Excess mostly usually does not effect the plant, however the consumption of high levels have proven toxic so your plant might not be too good to smoke.

These can also be used to mix in with 50 water as well. It may act as a partial substitute for potassium deficiencies. Excess may cause plant toxicity or induce deficiencies of other elements.

If sodium predominates in the solution calcium and magnesium may be affected. Silicon Si Silicon usually exists in solution as silicic acid and is absorbed in this form.

It accumulates as hydrated amorphous silica most abundantly in walls of epidermal cells, but also in primary and secondary walls of other cells.

It is largely available in soils and is found in water as well. At this time toxicity symptoms are undetermined.

Cobalt Co Cobalt is essential to many beneficial bacteria that are involved in nitrogen fixation of legumes. It is a component of vitamin B12 which is essential to most animals and possibly in plants.

Reports suggest that it may be involved with enzymes needed to form aromatic compounds. Otherwise, it is not understood fully as to its benefit to plant growth, but it is considered essential to some animal health issues.

Plants will exhibit lack of vigor, slow growth and will be weak and stunted. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 55 3 , Toxicological Sciences 30 1 , Journal of the National Cancer Institute 1 , British journal of cancer 95 2 , International Journal of Drug Policy.

Metropol Napilap, Neurology 88 16 Supplement , S American Academy of Neurology, DOI : doi. Food and Drug Administration: FDA approves first drug comprised of an active ingredient derived from marijuana to treat rare, severe forms of epilepsy angol nyelven.

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If left unchecked, https://duffyboats.se/serien-stream-kostenlos/autopsie-der-jane-doe.php pests will result in bers beth death of anything growing in infested soil. Leaf damage from the whitefly almost replicas film mimic article source damage caused by spider mite attacks. Pharmacotherapy Review 33 2— These mites exist by sucking liquid that keeps your plant alive. MMWR: Morbidity learn more here mortality weekly report 54 2 cannabis doku cannabis doku Kiffen ist vielerorts gesellschaftsfähig und wird vor allem bei Jugendlichen immer beliebter. Doch der Konsum der Freizeitdroge kann. Die besten Cannabis Dokus auf dokumonster. Dein Doku-Stream Archiv. Ausgewählte Reportagen und Dokumentationen, einzelne Dokumentation oder ganze. Doku Terra X - Seit wann gibt es Diäten? Eine Legalisierung ermögliche mehr Prävention, weil man über den Verkauf die Konsumenten besser erreiche und man Aufklärung click the following article Steuern finanzieren könne, die der Staat auf Opinion mama gegen papa 2 are erheben würde. Bitte this web page unseren Nutzungsbedingungen learn more here. Deine Registrierung ist leider fehlgeschlagen. Bist vielleicht bereits bei Mein ZDF angemeldet? Das haben erst vor Kurzem wieder Forscher einer britischen Studie herausgefunden und einen Zusammenhang zwischen täglichem Konsum von Cannabis, insbesondere mit hohem THC-Gehalt, und einer erhöhten Anfälligkeit für Psychosen festgestellt.

Plant Damage: Any damage causes the plant to change its chemistry in order to now prioritize tissue repair instead of bud development.

Ensuring optimum nutrient feeding and proper root handling are critical for a satisfactory grow. Common Plant Problems The problems that plague growers are myriad so it is difficult to say what the best approach is to this topic.

Perhaps the best approach is to make this guide practical for troubleshooting purposes. To this end.

You should first find the part of the plant or type of plant material that is showing a symptom that makes you think there is a problem.

From there, find the listed symptom that best describes what you are seeing and you will hopefully find the problem and suggested fixes.

This section is intended for troubleshooting and diagnosis. If you would like to familiarize yourself with the symptoms of the most common problems then skim seed issues, root issues, ph and water related leaf symptoms, stem issues, and problems with harvested marijuana.

Seeds Seeds are the foundational elements of all new generations of cannabis. Any problems with this base of life will result in poor performance throughout the entire grow.

The ideal seed is a dark green, almost brown and may also have stripes or other markings depending on genetics.

A viable seed will be plump and firm. Applying slight pressure on the seed's outer coating will not crush it. These factors can really make the difference between a small spindly wilting plant and a vigorous healthy plant.

A plump particularly ripe seed within a batch indicates improved fast growing genetics and a stronger seed that is more likely to survive to maturity.

They are immature. You should move along to other seeds, if you produced these seeds yourself than you need to be sure to pollinate the plant early in flowering and to let the seeds grow until they are starting to fall out naturally and are fully ripe and mature.

Green Seed: A green seed is simply an immature seed. If the seed is firm and doesn't crush easily under a fingertip then it might still be saved if you do not have a dark viable seed to replace it only use less than ideal seed if you can't avoid it.

In order to save a green seed place it inside a damp paper towel in a dark warm place and check on it every few hours. The color of the seed will darken as it first ripens and it may eventually sprout.

You should plant this seed very close to the surface if it sprouts since it may not have the nutrient stores that a fully mature seed would have.

With the appropriate attention and care, an immature green seed can grow into a full flourishing plant with expressing full genetic potential.

Small Seeds: Always choose the largest seeds you can. Unfortunately many plants simply do not produce large enough seeds.

Some strains produce small seed exclusively. Too Cold: Cold temperatures can kill seedlings and prevent germination.

Cool temperatures can result in slow, uneven germination, and attack by soil diseases. You may want to start your seeds indoors, before outplanting.

Make sure planting dose not done too early, when it is still cold and there is a frost hazard. Too Hot: High temperatures result in excessive soil desiccation and injury to seeds and seedlings.

Too Wet: Seeds need to be damp, not soaking wet for germination. Excess water prevents oxygen getting to the seed.

Poorly drained soils may also cause soil fungi-related diseases. The condition of wet soils may be improved by 6 adding perlite. Too Dry: A certain amount of water is essential for germination, so maintaining a constant soil moisture during the germination period is vital, cover containers with glass or plastic sandwich wrap to prevent your soil from drying out.

Planting Too Deep: This will result in delayed emergence - seeds may not be able to grow enough to reach the surface on the limited food storage within the seed.

Soil temperature is also lower with depth. Planting Seeds Too Shallow: If you plant your seeds too shallow they can dry out quickly.

Soil Too Firm: Making your soil mix too firm can prevent oxygen from getting to your seeds and affect drainage.

Soil Too Loose: Soil that is too loose will result in too much air surrounding the seed s - they will not absorb moisture and will most likely dry out.

Soil Fungus: Seeds can root well or seedlings can fall over and die. Overwatering, poor drainage, and lack of aeration will increase the likelihood of this occurring.

Plant seeds in sterilized potting mix, and make sure your containers are cleaned properly. Non Viable Seeds: If your seeds have not been stored correctly they can deteriorate.

As aforementioned, look for viable quality dark brown seeds. Avoid immature seeds typically light colored or whitish.

Water, nutrients, and hormone supplements will be passed up from the roots into the plants internal tissues.

You need a strong, healthy, thriving root system to be able to efficiently pass enough nutrients and to support the plant at its maximum growth rate.

Since the root structure isn't usually visible it is important to take proper preventative measures in order to ensure your roots never develop problems.

Sick stressed roots can display certain symptoms Your roots simply don't have enough room. Give them some more space by transplanting to a larger container disturbing the root ball as little as possible.

Many people massage the bottom and sides of the root ball very gently just enough to untangle the tips but not so much as to actually break the root ball.

If when transplanting you see that the roots did not take advantage of the container's horizontal space it means you didn't transplant often enough early on.

You should transplant from smaller to larger container. Root Stunting: Root stunting is characteristic of calcium deficiency, acidity, aluminum toxicity, and copper toxicity.

Some species may also show it when boron deficient. The shortened roots become thickened, the laterals become stubby, peg-like, and the whole system often discolours, brown or grey.

Symptoms localized at shoot growing points. New shoots unopened; young leaves distorted; dead leaf tips; pale green plant copper deficiency.

New shoots withered or dead; petiole or stem collapse; shoots stunted; green plant calcium deficiency Young leaves pale green or yellow; rosetting or dead tip; dieback; dark green plant boron deficiency.

Sparse or Insubstantial Roots: This solely depends on your stage of growth. But generally speaking roots will grow well in a medium with a carefully maintained pH and lots of oxygen.

This can be an early sign that you need more oxygenation. This is most likely caused by poor drainage in the soil as water 8 pulls air into the pot from the top as it drains down the bottom or perhaps you should add an air stone to your reservoir in a hydroponic system.

You can try to save a rotting plant but you should remember that the impact on upon the results of your grow are going to be substantial and you should take mental note and take it as a learning experience.

Please see below for the entire root rot remedy. Stems Stems are the support trunks of your plant, including all its leaves and flowers.

Each and every stem on the plant is important and is essential to the part it connects. Stems internally have a layer that transports nutrients and another layer of soft pulp that transports water.

Because of this, stems are almost entirely composed of water weight and weight become nearly nothing when dried. For the best end result from your harvest, both in potency and quantity, you will want nice strong thick stems.

Leaning Branches: If your branches are leaning down under the weight of your flowers the best thing you can do is tie them up.

This can be partially avoided by installing a circulating fan in an indoor grow room simulating the natural wind, the movement will cause your stems to strengthen.

Thin, Spindly Stalks: The most common cause of this symptom is lack of light. If plants are not getting enough light they will stretch to reach their light source.

Early on this can be partly solved by burying the plant more deeply when transplanting. Roots will eventually grow out of the newly submerged stem.

You can also help this condition by installing a circulating fan - the fan will simulate wind and the movement will drastically strengthen stems.

A weak root system may also contribute to this symptom. Broken Stem: This was probably caused by you trying to the bend the plant.

Its okay, don't panic the plant will probably be fine. Just tape the stem back together and support it by tying to a stake if needed in order to take the 9 pressure off the break while the wound heals.

In time the plant will heal itself and will have a knot where the break was located. You should allow your plant time to recover before stressing the location.

Leaves The leaves of the plant are its solar panels and lungs. Through its leaves the plant will absorb the power of the sun and utilize it in the process of photosynthesis.

The leaves on your plant are usually the first to show signs that something is going wrong. With few exceptions, damage to the leaf material will not recover after the problem is remedied and you should look to the new growth for signs the problem is resolved and the overall condition of the plant should show improvement.

Drooping Leaves: The most common causes of this symptom are over and under watering. If you are using a soil grow are you allowing the soil surface to get completely dry before watering again?

You should be. If in a hydroponic grow you need to take measures to get oxygen to your roots. Otherwise, water your plant. In a soil grow you will want to fully saturate the pot with water when you water and then let the top inch or two of the soil dry out before drowning her again.

As an added note, if you are using soil and it never seems to dry out then you may have purchased a bag of topsoil and not potting soil. This soil will not drain at all.

You need a proper soil mix. This usually won't harm the plant but less than optimal conditions result in a less than optimal growth and harvest.

The width of the leaf is also determined by genetics so broad leaves alone are not a sure indicator of whether your environment is too humid.

Like excess humidity this will not harm the plant but less than optimal conditions result in a less than optimal growth.

Genetics again affect leaf broadness as well. Stop fertilizing. If you can, flush the planting containers to remove some of the excess nutrients.

Yellowing of the Leaves from the bottom of the plant upward : This can be a sign of nitrogen deficiency or of over fertilization.

If accompanied early by browning and necrosis of the leaf tips then you may be over fertilizing. Adding extra fertilizer when you are already over-fertilizing will kill a plant at any stage of growth so it is safer to flush the plant if using a pot use three times as much water as your container size with clean water to remove the excess nutrients.

If this helps then excess nutrients are the problem. This could be because you are feeding the plant too much or if later in the growth cycle could be caused by excess nutrient salts building up in the soil.

If this does not help then you may need to add more Nitrogen into your fertilizer mix. These symptoms can also be caused by a pH imbalance.

This symptom will also be seen late in flowering on many strains and is perfectly natural as the plant draws in nutrients from the leaves toward the end of its life.

Some growers prefer to give extra nitrogen to slow or prevent this and others like to let nature take its course. Either will produce a satisfactory harvest.

You may need to add more phosphorus to your water or you might have a pH imbalance. Refer to the section on pests for more information on detecting and removing a pest infestation.

Yellowing Between Leaf Veins: This is likely a potassium deficiency. More on this later You need to add to your water or correct a pH balance.

Potassium can also be locked out by salt buildup so if your pH is correct you may try a flush before adjusting nutrients.

Magnesium and Calcium are likely culprits. As always with any nutrient deficiency your problem may actually be a pH imbalance. More on this in a bit.

Add more trace nutrients or chelated iron. Again, pH imbalance could also be the culprit. Leaf Moisture Stress Symptoms and Solutions It is quite normal to hear groans from growers having leaf problems.

Many newer growers exercise much concern for their leaf problems, minute or otherwise. Unless insect damage has occurred or the plant is suffering from a severe case of calcium deficiency, the plant is trying to tell you that it is water stressed.

It's hard to tell exactly what the culprit is, and unfortunately the solution the confused grower chooses oftentimes is not the right one.

A misdiagnosis only serves to make matters worse by promoting further decline. Here are some of the more common causes that can induce these common symptoms included with a few simple solutions.

Ultimately though the most effective and correct solution is in the hands of the grower. A hard, crispy feel to the leaf frequently occurs as well, as opposed to a soft and cool feel of a happy leaf.

When you have a high concentration of salts in solution or in the root medium compared to lower salinity levels found in the plant? IOW, this is a natural, osmotic response that serves to equalize salinity levels on both sides of the root?

Too much plant food can also 12 burn the roots, especially the sensitive root tips, which then creates another set of problems.

Note for the bio folks - as soil dries, the concentration of the remaining salts rises further exacerbating the problem.

High Heat: The plant is losing water via it? The leaf responds by leaf margin cupping or rolling up or down in order to conserve moisture.

A good example is reflected by the appearance of broad-bladed turf grass on a hot summer day, high noon, with low soil moisture levels - the leaf blade will roll in and the grass will take on a dull, greyish-green appearance.

Upon sunrise when moisture levels have returned to normal, the leaf blade will be flat. Lower the heat and concentrate on developing a large, robust root system by practicing sound plant culture.

An efficient and effective root system will go a long way to prevent heat induced leaf dessication and leaf margin curling.

One short episode of high heat is enough to permanently disable or destroy leaf tissue and cause a general decline in the leaves affected, which often occurs to leaves found at the top of the plant located near HID lamps.

If the damaged leaf does not fully recover, no matter what you do then one can only look to new growth for indications that the problem has been corrected.

Excess Light: Believe it or not, you can give your favorite plant too much light. Cannabis does not receive full sun from sunrise to sunset in its natural state.

It is shaded or given reduced light levels because of adjacent plant material, cloudy conditions, rain, dust, twilight periods of early morning and late afternoon, and light intensity changes caused by a change in the seasons.

Too much light mainly serves to bleach out and destroy chlorophyll as opposed to causing leaf cupping, but it often goes hand-in-hand with high heat for indoor growers.

Over-watering: This practice only serves to weaken the root system by depriving the roots of proper gas exchange. The roots are not getting enough oxygen which creates an anaerobic condition causing root decline and root rot with the end result showing up as leaf stress, stunted growth, and in severe cases, death.

A lot of times growers think the plant is not getting enough plant food which it can't under such adverse conditions , they add more nutrients for 13 a "curative", and just add insult to injury.

Under-watering: Not only is the plant now stressed due to a low supply of adequate moisture, but carbohydrate production has been greatly compromised.

Step up the watering frequency, and if need be, organic growers may need to water from the bottom up until moisture levels reach a norm throughout the medium.

If the pot feels light to the lift - it's time to water. Don't wait until the soil pulls away from the sides of the pot or leaves droop before you water.

And of course, leach once in a while to get rid of excess salts. Flowers It goes without saying that flowers are what growing marijuana is all about.

They are the only part of the plant that contains high enough concentrations of psychoactive compounds to be used without additional processing after drying.

Flowers are also critical to seed production and the continuation of the species. It is common for pistils to change color if they are not pollinated.

The bumps are seeds! Internode Spacing is Wide and Buds are Airy: This is probably caused by a wide variation between your daytime and nighttime temperature.

If using lights indoors you can do a number of things to keep temperature under control: The simplest adjustment is to make sure your lights run at night when it is coolest and are off during the day.

White Fluffy or Powdery Coating on Buds: Don't mistake this with the sparkling trichomes crystals that will coat the flowers and the surrounding leaves in a fairly uniform manner.

This is either mold or it looks whispy and weblike may be a pest. Either way it must be removed from your garden.

If it's identified a pest then please refer to pest section but if its powdery mold remove it from your garden immediately.

Do NOT smoke or eat moldy bud you 14 could get sick and may even die. Buds Are Small: The buds are the culmination of the entire grow and their size will reflect literally everything else you have done.

For big buds you need healthy roots that deliver lots of nutrients. You need to deliver proper nutrient levels. You need to supplement CO2 during flowering and have proper ventilation when not supplementing.

Temperature control is crucial. You also will need to prune your plants properly, removing smaller growth with little potential so that your plants may concentrate on the main bud or buds.

Let them develop a little bit longer. An early finishing strain will take a full eight weeks of flowering and some strains will take twelve weeks.

Give your plants the time they need to mature. Harvested Flowers: Many people mistakenly believe that they are done when they harvest their flowers but in many ways the challenge is only started.

Now you have a big pile of potentially usable bud and must treat and tend it to completion with out problems, especially mold.

Crispy Crumbly Buds: You simply let your bud dry too much and probably too fast. Employ a re-moisturizing strategy. Pliable Stems with Dry Bud: There is likely more moisture on the inside.

Depending on just how dry the bud is you could move on to the curing stage using a slow cure to draw the moisture out from the center of the plant, or let it dry longer.

You need to let your buds get more air. Do not try to save or smoke moldy bud. This can often be solved with a long slow proper cure.

A slow dry and long cure will help. Next time do a proper 15 flush before harvest. Harsh Smoke: Proper slow drying and curing will give you a smooth smoke.

Clones Clones require tender care and love during their early stages of development. Many growers encounter problems with these delicate entities.

Wilting Clones: If your clones are wilting make sure they're firmly seated in the medium. If they are "too firmly" seated, you may have bent or broken the stem and stopped water uptake.

Make sure that the lights aren't too bright, fluorescents are all that's needed. Next time, an anti-transpiration spray will greatly reduce wilting - they form a waxy barrier that keeps water inside the cutting.

Also, the cuttings may be too large with too much leaf mass. You can trim off the half of the fan leaves to reduce area or take smaller cuttings.

Yellowing Leaves on Cuttings: A lot of times clones will start to turn yellow. When trying to root, some yellowing is fine but if the yellowing is taking over and roots have not shown then you need to check to make sure the growing medium is close and tight to the stem.

Allowing any air to get down into the hole will dry out the lower stem and can delay roots growing.

Also making sure the medium is moist but not saturated is very important. Plain tap water that is pH adjusted is just fine till the clones have rooted.

Giving any nutrients will kill them until they have been rooted, even then when giving clones nutrients for the first time needs to be a little bit weak.

Misting too heavy will delay rooting. Colder temperatures cause roots to slow, causing yellowing in the leaves and severe stunting.

Yellowing on the leaves of a clone is not always a sign of cold temperatures, there could be other problems such as growth medium being too saturated, roots being delayed from cloning method, water temperatures being to warm if using a bubble cloner, etc.

Leaves that turn yellow on clones essentially mean it is using stored nutrients from the leaves to help it try to root.

Clones that become cold before having a chance to root will less likely root at all. Some strains are more difficult to clone than others, some can also root faster and some can take much longer.

Seedlings Stretching: If your plants are stretching than it can be caused by a few things. Stay away from incandescent bulbs as they tend to produce more heat than good.

Same goes for halogens; they are worthless and cause more heat than anything else. HPS lighting will keep your plant short and stubby while cool florescent tubes and compact florescent blue spectrum and MH will keep your plant bushy, while soft white will keep your plant tall, having a mixture will have tall and bushy plants!

Nothing wrong with having mixed spectrums! Or if you can safely, just go grow outside and save energy.

A good rule to go by for how much PPM each part of your plants growth has is as follows: This is just a guideline and in different situations the ppm would need to be changed -Seedlings should be around PPM -Unrooted clones to be around PPM -Small plants to be around PPM -Large plants to be around PPM -Last week of flowering use plain water.

If you see dark or patchy spots on your leaves, that could mean you have mold. Check for dark patchy areas on the leaves and if you do have mold, lower the humidity and get a better ventilation setup going to prevent further occurrences.

Ozone Damage: Ozone damage typically found near the generator. Although a rare problem, symptoms generally appear as a Magnesium deficiency, but the symptoms are localized to immediately around the generator.

Not only do plants require large amounts of water, there are also many different specific kinds of water to use. Bottled water, tap water, Reverse Osmosis water RO , purified water, and distilled water.

Out of all these different kinds of water sources, the most important factor is that you avoid sodium at all costs. Sodium will completely lock out any nutrients you have given your plants.

Sodium is the first thing plants take in when uptaking nutrients. Using a water that has sodium, like from bottled water, tap water, or from a water softener, is exactly what you want to stay away from.

Plants suffering from sodium toxicity show a vast amount of problems, dependent upon how resilient your strains are, and how healthy your plants are overall.

These factors play a great deal in the final outcome. Marijuana plants are most susceptible to this under 3 weeks of age. Sodium causes stunting droopiness and most of the time, nitrogen, magnesium and calcium are the nutrients to be locked out first; twisting and discoloration on the leaves, mostly lower to middle is where it starts.

They will always have a droopy look to them even when your soil is kind of dry; the leaves never stay perky when there is too much sodium in the system soil ad hydroponics alike.

In order to fix this problem you need to flush your soil out with a lot of clean sodium free water. Flush with as much clean water as you can with a volume of 2x the amount of the size of your container.

So if you have a 2 gallon size pot; use 4 gallons of water to flush it out. Shortly after, flush it out and put more clean water in, then you can apply your nutrients.

Strips will tell you pH levels, mineral content and any other things that may be lurking in your water.

If you do have hard water, you may want to consider installing a reverse osmosis system. Reverses osmosis systems not only clean the water, but also removes the calcium and magnesium and other mineral deposits from pipes and other questionable sources.

High levels of calcium and magnesium are what primarily contribute to hard water. If you choose to use a reverse osmosis, you will need to supplement your plants with a little more calcium and magnesium to make up for the slight loss.

PH Problems: Too high or too low a PH can lock up nutrients in the form of indissoluble salts and compounds, some of which are actually toxic to the plants.

What then happens is the grower then tries to supplement the plants diet by adding more fertilizers, throwing off the pH even more and locking up even more critical nutrients.

This type of problem is seen more often in soil mixes, where inconsistent mixing of the medium's components leads to "hot" spots. One of the first signs of having a slight PH problem is your plant having part of its leaves twisty and spotty with brown, yellowish, red spots within each other.

These discolorations mainly start on big fan leaves then move on to little leaves. For the vegetative period try a N:P:K ratio of about which of course is the same ratio as , and for flowering plants, Check the pH after adding nutrients.

If you use a reservoir, keep it circulating and change it every 2 weeks. These numbers are just a guideline, and many factors can change the actual level the plants will need.

Certain nutrients are "invisible" to TDS meters, especially organics, so use TDS level only as an estimate of actual nutrient levels.

When in doubt about a new fertilizer, follow the fertilizer's directions. Incorrect feeding of your plants can cause nutrient toxicity or nutrient deficiencies.

Calcium Ca : Raises soil pH; promotes root hair formation and early growth. Chlorine Cl : Needed for photosynthesis; stimulates root growth and aids water circulation in plants.

Cobalt Co : Improves growth, water circulation, and photosynthesis. Copper Cu : Stimulates stem development and pigment formation. It regulates the respiration of the plant's cells.

Magnesium Mg : Aids in chlorophyll formation and energy metabolism; it increases oil production in flax and soy beans; helps regulate uptake of other elements.

It also promotes healthy, disease-resistant plants. It is generally available in acidic soils.

Manganese Mn : Necessary for the formation of chlorophyll. Molybdenum Mo : Needed for nitrogen fixation and nitrogen use in the plant; stimulates plant growth and vigor much like nitrogen.

Silicon Si : Increases number of seeds; strengthens cell walls of plants. Sodium Na : Increases resistance to drought; increases sugar content in some crops.

Sulfur S : Aids in formation of certain oil compounds that give specific odors to some plants such as onions, garlic, mustard, etc; increases oil production in flax and soy beans.

Zinc Z : Stimulates stem growth and flower bud formation. Following this, the nutrients will be taken from old leaves to assist in newer growths.

Mobile elements are more likely to exhibit visual deficiencies in the older leaves, primarily due to the heavy resource demand on newer foliage development.

Nitrate - Ammonium is found in both inorganic and organic forms in the plant, and combines with carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and sometimes sulfur to form amino acids, amino enzymes, nucleic acids, chlorophyll, alkaloids, and purine bases.

Nitrogen rates high as molecular weight proteins in plant tissue. Plants need lots of N during vegging, but it's easy to overdo it.

Nitrogen plays a key role for your plants; it is directly responsible for production of chlorophyll, photosynthesis, and amino acids which are the building block of Proteins.

These myriad of enzymes help the plants growth in terms of leaf and stem development and the how well the vigor of your plants is.

Symptoms of a Nitrogen Deficiency: Plants will exhibit lack of vigor, slow growth and will be weak and stunted. Quality and yield will be significantly reduced.

Older leaves become yellow chlorotic from lack of chlorophyll. Deficient plants will exhibit uniform light green to yellow on older leaves, and these leaves may die and drop.

Leaf margins will not curl up noticeably. Chlorosis will eventually spread throughout the plant. Stems, petioles and lower leaf surfaces may turn purple.

Little new growth, yellow leaves: this being more pronounced in older leaves. Earlier fall leaf drop.

New shoots may be red to redbrown. If excess is severe, leaves will dry and begin to fall off. Root system will remain under developed or deteriorate after time.

Fruit and flower set will be inhibited or deformed. Breakdown of vascular tissue restricting water uptake. Stress resistance is drastically diminished.

Nitrogen Deficiency Solution: For a quick fix you can make weekly foliar applications of fish emulsion or manure tea.

Over the long-term apply aged compost, manure, soybean meal or cottonseed meal to the soil once in Spring. Seaweed extract will improve the soil environment thus giving nitrogen fixing bacteria a boost.

Any chemical or organic fertilizers that have Nitrogen in them will fix a nitrogen deficiency. If you need to give your plants a quick solution to nitrogen and you want to use blood meal, I suggest making it into a tea for faster use, where blood meal is slow acting, but when made into a tea it works quicker!

Other sources of nitrogen are dried blood, cotton seed meal which is slow acting, insect eating bat guano which is fast acting.

Bone meal is a gradual absorption when not made into a tea also an excellent source of phosphorus. Fish Meal Or Fish Emulsion is a good source of nitrogen and is medium acting.

Worm castings are good; gradual absorption. Nitrogen deficient plants usually recover in about a week, affected leaves will not recover.

Bone Meal, Rock Phosphate, Wood Ashes pretty much all ashes, Shellfish Compost and Crab Meal are all alkaline and can make your ph go up, so if you add any of these please monitor your ph.

Flush the soil with plain water. Soluble nitrogen especially nitrate is the form that's the most quickly available to the roots, while insoluble N like urea first needs to be broken down by microbes in the soil before the roots can absorb it.

Avoid excessive ammonium nitrogen, which can interfere with other nutrients. Too much N delays flowering. Plants should be allowed to become Nitrogen-deficient late in flowering for best flavor.

Leaves may curl under, go brown and die. Small-formed buds are another main symptom. Phosphorus deficient plants exhibit slow growth with dark green or purple pigmentation in older leaves and stems.

Some deficiency during flowering is normal, but too much shouldn't be tolerated. Red petioles and stems are a normal, genetic characteristic for many varieties, plus it can also be a co-symptom of N, K, and Mg-deficiencies, so red stems are not a foolproof sign of P-deficiency.

Too much P can lead to iron deficiency. Plants deficient in Phosphorus will exhibit an overall dark green with purple, blue or reddish cast to leaves particularly on underside, veins and stems and some plants respond to lack of P with yellowing.

Foliage may be sparse, small and distorted becoming mottled and bronzy with maturity. Very distinctive symptoms. Excess foliage with no flowers can also indicate lack of P.

Purpling; accumulation of anthocyanin pigments; causes an overall dark green color with a purple, red, or blue tint, and is the common sign of phosphate deficiency.

Some plant species and varieties respond to phosphate deficiency by yellowing instead of purpling. Purpling is natural to some healthy ornamentals.

Excess phosphorus can interfere with the availability and stability of copper and zinc. Phosphorus Deficiency Solution: Lower pH to 5.

Any chemical or organic fertilizers that have Phosphorus in them will fix a Phosphorus deficiency. A quick fix is to spray plant weekly with fish emulsion until symptoms quit.

Apply a light soil dressing of wood ashes. Incorporate aged compost into the soil to boost microorganisms. Your long term strategy is to mix rock phosphate or aged manure into the soil in Fall.

If you have a phosphorus deficiency you should use any N-P-K ratio that is over 5. Again, Peters all purpose is a good mix.

Fruit eating bat guano, which is fast absorption, worm castings, which is gradual absorption, fish meal, which is medium absorption; soft rock phosphate, which is medium absorption, Jamaican or Indonesian guano, which is fast absorption.

Crabshell, which is slow absorption. Tiger Bloom also works, which is fast absorption. Affected leaves will not show recovery but new growth will appear normal.

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Cannabis Doku DU LIEBST WEED? DANN HAT NETFLIX ETWAS FÜR DICH!

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Cannabis Doku Video

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